Watch Out

Posted on Dec 7, 2010 | 9 comments

WatchOut2Did you know that the king cobra snake has enough venom in each bite to kill an elephant? Learn all about the world’s most dangerous animals–including tiger sharks, black widow spiders, and polar bears–in this fact-filled Level 3 reader.

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9 Comments

  1. I love this book

  2. wow the snake is scary i would not wanna go near it but i love this book

  3. oh no!!!!!!! LOL

  4. Thanks! I had a great time visiting Grange Hall Elementary yesterday. Happy Reading!

  5. hi! you came to my school on march 24 and the book WATCH OUT is also about snakes, my teacher is afraid of snakes!

  6. Hi there! I had a great time at your school, and I think you’ll really enjoy reading Watch Out! when it comes out in August. Tell your teacher that only the King Cobra is in the book, but there are lots of other cool animals in the book too. Happy Reading!

  7. Hello, Ginjer. I am in fifth grade and I am obsessed with you. I have loved writing since I was a little girl. I wrote when I had nothing else. I have wanted to be like you ever since I saw your site. You are an amazing author and I would like some tips. You came to dare elementary on Friday and I was the one who asked for your e-mail in case you don’t remember me. I would love a reply. Thank you

  8. Ginjer, I love your books and I have loved to write since I was a little girl. This book was particularly my favorite. I was wondering if you had any tips for fiction books. I would love some tips from you because as I was reading your books, I was astonished and you would be a great coach. You came to dare elementary and I was the one who asked for your email. I would love a reply. If you have any tips they would be awesome. thanks

  9. Hi there! I had a great time visiting your school last week, and I’m so glad that you enjoy reading my books. My tips for writing fiction would be the same as for nonfiction. Try to use the best descriptive and action words that you can think of. Also, writers do something called “show, don’t tell,” which means that instead of TELLING your readers that your character is sad, try SHOWING them what this really means. For example, is your character sobbing and flopped on the floor or just tears in her eyes and her head in her hands? Think about what your characters look like and imagine them as real people when you tell your stories. I do this even with animal nonfiction so that I can picture the action and write it to you as if it’s happening right in front of me. I hope that helps, and I wish you lots of fun playing with your writing. Take care. –Ginjer Clarke

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